Category Archives: Washington

Blue Angels

As seen through the smoke that blankets Western Washington, the Blue Angels.

View from the Pike Place Market

Yesterday, on a Chamber of Commerce weather day, we took our two grandkids to the Pike Place Market to have lunch and to check out the refurbed section of the Market. We traveled by bus from West Seattle; I have to insert that I think comparing NYC Subways and Seattle Metro buses is likely close to happening).

Highlights of the images ( which are all  shot on my iPhone, with the aid of a detachable lens  are: The Wheel, Mt. Rainier, Elliott Bay, Alki Point in West Seattle and the soon-to-become extinct Viaduct/SR99.

One of the highlights of the outing was viewing and contributing to the new Gum Wall!

Anyway, the foray into downtown Seattle for a few of hours was about all my broken down body could endure. The current Seattle agency in charge of tourism promotion of the city seemed to be doing a bang up job as the Market was jam packed, even for a Tuesday!

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Version 2Looking towards the Olympic Mountains from Puget Sound.

Rhody in the Wild

Duwamish River Access

A couple of weeks ago I went to a spot on the east side Duwamish River that I didn’t know existed. Much of what I have posted, regarding the Duwamish River over the years, has been taken from the west side at various locations. The Port of Seattle owns this access point, adjacent to the new Federal Building above ( something else I had no idea existed as it is set quite a ways back from East Marginal Way).

This area, like many along the Duwamish River, used to be inhabited by indigenous peoples. Rich in history that is almost totally overlooked by Seattleites today. I know the signs are not readable in the photos, but if you can zoom in and maybe find a few keywords to Google, you might be able to dive deeper into the history of this area. The Duwamish River used to snake its way down to Elliott Bay, but in the past ( probably for reasons of commerce) the river’s curvy path was straightened out to what it is today.

The Duwamish River, which I find fascinating, is the first EPA Superfund Site in the US and is still a work in progress 47 years  on. This says something about the scope of cleaning a river estuary. Although the area is much cleaner and less polluted today, it still has a way to go. Many of the heavy polluting businesses that were located along the river have since moved or closed down. I think dredging the river bottom is not a possibility as it would stir up much of the heavy metals, etc. Similarly, in Brooklyn, NYC, I have been following the efforts to clean up the Gowanus Canal, which was declared a superfund site a few years ago. This past Fall, a Portland, Oregon company was awarded the first contract to do  a superficial dredging to remove debris that was sitting on the bottom of one small section of the canal, without disturbing the sediment. I was there the week this was being done. It was just a pilot project, but was fascinating to watch. A rep from the Portland company was on site to both watch over the pilot dredging, but to be available to answer questions from the public ( such as me, who pestered her for about 30 minutes, till it started to rain). The Portland company actually contracted with the company that dredged the Love Canal decades ago, as they had the expertise and equipment to perform this sensitive work. With the new administration coming in last January, all work on the Gowanus Canal is up in the air, even though monies were allocated to get the project going.

If interested, there is a lot of info online. If you dig back in my posts to around last November ( 11th and 13th) I think I posted a few photos of the initial dredging of the small section of the Gowanus Canal. I also did a couple of Facebook check-in type postings showing the barge and crane at work.

Will be posting more from this site on the Duwamish River over the next couple of weeks. My apologies for getting a bit sidetracked. There are similarities between the two sites that I find fascinating.

 

Friday Blues

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Tulip Field, Etc.

Well, what would a tulip farm be without a faux windmill and a herd of Honey Buckets?

Taken at Rozengaard Farm, Mt. Vernon, WA.,in the Skagit Valley.

Skagit Valley

Rail Spur

Location: South of Ellensburg, WA. Deserted building along a rail spur in Eastern Washington.

Under the Rail Bridge

At this spot on the Yakima River there is a rail bridge over a small stream that feeds into the river. A fun spot to explore, but not when a train is passing through.

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